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Cohabitation – a change in the law?


Cohabitation A Change In The Law
Published: 10th September 2006 - Category: Civil Partnership Agreements - Author: Lynne Bastow

Why Bother To Get Married?

There are 2 differences between getting married and living together:

  1. A wedding
  2. Legal rights and obligations

For some people the wedding is the most important bit, and we’ve all been to some great dos where no expense was spared but the couple in question have got nothing in common, not even sudoku!

The change in the law to allow same sex couples to have a wedding and the legal rights and obligations of marriage, in a Civil Ceremony, has created equal rights for homosexual couples. We can’t call it marriage though, because it would upset some religious people, and looking at the state of the world, a lot of them are upset enough already!

But What Of the Cohabitees?

Many people are calling for a change in the law to introduce similar rights and obligations to those couples who choose to live together, but who choose not to formalise their relationship. The Government is considering introducing laws to impose legal obligations on cohabiting couples, for example, if they had children or lived together for at least 2 years. I would advice caution here for the following reasons:

  1. Some people choose not to get married, not just because they don’t want to pay for a wedding but because they don’t want to encumber themselves with the legal obligations that marriage entails. Their reaction to any legal commitment by default will be to live apart. Typically, the more wealthy male will still buy a house on his own, but the unemployed female and 2 kids will join the housing queue. She and the kids will probably stay with him 5 nights a week, but now she will have her own house and either work at Tescos 16 hours a week to qualify for working tax and child tax credits, or she will go on benefits.
  2. It might upset some religious people!
Lynne Bastow Divorce Solicitor

Meet Lynne Bastow

With over 16 years experience, Lynne can provide excellent and valuable advice and has a friendly, positive approach towards all her clients, ensuring you get the best service possible.

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If you need more information on divorce, Lynne has published two informative guides on divorce, which you can purchase from Amazon.

The Little Book of Divorce

The Little Book of Divorce

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The Little Book of Divorce Dilemmas

The Little Book of Divorce Dilemmas

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